Research Data Leeds Repository

Nanoscale compositional segregation and suppression of polar coupling in a relaxor ferroelectric - dataset

Roncal-Herrero, Teresa and Harrington, John and Zeb, Aurang and Milne, Steven J. and Brown, Andy P. (2018) Nanoscale compositional segregation and suppression of polar coupling in a relaxor ferroelectric - dataset. University of Leeds. [Dataset] https://doi.org/10.5518/426

Dataset description

A number of relaxor ferroelectric ceramics have been demonstrated to possess a near stable value of relative permittivity over very wide temperature ranges. This cannot be explained by conventional theories of relaxors. One such system is based on the perovskite solid solution series: (1-x) (Ba0.8Ca0.2)TiO3-xBi(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3, giving stable relative permittivity from 150 to 500 °C. We show by scanning transmission electron microscopyand electron energy loss spectroscopic elemental mapping that nanoscale compositional segregation occurs in the temperature stable relaxor composition (x = 0.55), with Ba/Ti clusters some 2–4 nm in extent, separated by Bi-rich regions of comparable size. This nanomosaic structure is consistent with phase separation into a ferroelectrically active BaTiO3 – type phase (Ba/Ti rich) and a weakly polar Bi/(Mg) rich perovskite solid solution. The possibility that nanophase segregation is the cause of weak dipole coupling and suppression of the dielectric relaxation peak is considered.

Keywords: Electron Microscope, high temperature, stable temperature relaxor ferroelectric, chemical segregsation, functional ceramics
Divisions: Faculty of Engineering > School of Chemical and Process Engineering
Related resources:
LocationType
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actamat.2018.07.053Publication
http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/134846/Publication
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Date deposited: 26 Oct 2018 15:36
URI: https://archive.researchdata.leeds.ac.uk/id/eprint/442

Files

Documentation

Data

Research Data Leeds Repository is powered by EPrints
Copyright © 2021 University of Leeds